Holga Camera Photography

The Holga is an inexpensive, 120 film plastic camera made in China. It has a problem producing quality photos which has attracted many photographers to add this camera to their array of equipment and many of the photographs produced have received lots of attention for their distorted look. There are many variations of the Holga camera from the 120S with it’s fixed shutter speed and plastic lens to the 120GFCN with it’s color flash and glass lens. Once you see some of the photos people have produced with the it, you may be convinced to buy one of these cheap toy cameras to play seriously around with. You can find some pretty good deals on Amazon.

Image by Oldtasty

Image by Oldtasty

Here are some great Holga images that prove that even a small plastic camera in the right hands can produce quality photographs.

Ford Lake by Matt Callow

Ford Lake by Matt Callow

Bales by Matt Callow

Bales by Matt Callow

Trees & Reflections by Schoeband

Trees & Reflections by schoeband

Bridge by schoeband

Bridge by schoeband

Star Streaks 60 min by Liquid Lucidity

Star Streaks 60 min by Liquid Lucidity

Streets of Killarney by thephotoholic

Streets of Killarney by thephotoholic

a painting artist by Vick the Viking

a painting artist by Vick the Viking

Night by Matt Callow

Night by Matt Callow

wrestling by Prof-B

wrestling by Prof-B

47 Turn Here by Daniel Y. Go

47 Turn Here by Daniel Y. Go

Broken Factory Window by ansel mcadams

Broken Factory Window by ansel mcadams

Allen Lake by Matt Callow

Allen Lake by Matt Callow

untitled by Tamiro

untitled by Tamiro

motion shooting by Tazebao

motion shooting by Tazebao

untitled by Danie Y. Go

untitled by Danie Y. Go

The Road Ahead by Matt Callow

The Road Ahead by Matt Callow

Flying Holga by jonnyphoto

Flying Holga by jonnyphoto

Ohio by nimrodcooper

Ohio by nimrodcooper

untitled by Daniel Y. Go

untitled by Daniel Y. Go

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  • Comments
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  1. Daniel Go

    Thanks for featuring some of my photos here :)

  2. Andreina Schoeberlein

    Thank you for choosing some of mine.

  3. rara ,

    can holga upload images to computers ?
    reply in my website! thnks.

    • Larry

      Holga is a film camera, not digital; so, no it can’t upload to your computer.

    • grizzbar

      The short answer… NO! The long, detailed answer: The only way to get your “film” into “digital” form is either to have someone scan it or to scan it yourself. Most “Lomo-Freaks” out there have their own flatbed/film scanner and tend to do it themselves to save money. One of the problems I have seen people having lately is simply finding a lab that can even process the film in the first place. Any Pro lab should have the means to both process and scan your 120 negs, and might even have the ability to run E-6 or slide/transperancy film stock. Some have even resorted to using Walmart’s outlab service to process & print their film, but I am unaware if the outlab can scan the film… GRIZZ

  4. Tausha

    Do all Holga cameras produce the black fading at the corners or is it only some models?

    • kerry

      this is called vignetting, and it completely depends on your camera. all holgas creat vignetting, however some specifuc cameras create more than others. this is what makes you holga camera unique! hope this was a help :)

    • grizzbar

      Most of the Holgas out there have a little vignetting in them to start with. However, what you are looking at is what is known as, “Four Corners Dark”. This is when the Holgagrapher actually removes the 12-frame insert, or film plane, from the inside of the camera. They then tape up the inside of the camera and outside seams to guard against light leaks. The whole process is to put a slight bend to the film causing the four corners to be slightly farther away from the light coming in from the lens than the center of the film. This not only causes some wicked vignetting it also lends a dreamy quality to the overall shot with areas of “softer focus” mixed with areas of “clearer focus”! Check out my blog for more examples: holgamodgod.blogspot.com. I hope I have been informative! GRIZZ

  5. Emma

    I really like these photos. They all have a uniqueness about them, and I think they are all really really awesome.

  6. Katherine

    Were filters used on some of these cameras or was it just the lighting that create some of these effects? (e.g. pictures, 1,2,6,13 & 16). Or was it the way they were developed?

    Very awesome photos!

    • Nate

      I doubt filters were used, although I’m sure it’s possible. I’d say the type of film, the kind of Holga camera being used, and how they are developed are the main reasons that contribute to the photos looking like they do (along with lighting, composition, etc).

      Truly cool photos that make you want to get one and try it out.

    • grizzbar

      It is extremely possible that color filters were used in the B&W shots. One trick the Holgagraphers out there use is a “stepping ring”. This is a metal ring that has two threads on it: outer & inner. It was designed for photographers who had one barrel diameter on their lens that wanted to use a larger filter on the end of the lens. The great thing about all of the Holga 120N series cameras is that the inside diameter of the lens is exactly 46mm. So, rummage around in your filter collection and decide which size filters you have the most of: 49mm, 52mm, or 55mm. Then go down to your local Pro Camera Shop and pick up a 46mm to 49mm, 46mm to 52mm or a 46mm to 55mm “stepping ring”. To install the ring to your Holga camera twist the lens clockwise until it stops; carefully screw the 46mm side of the stepping ring into the front of the lens, making sure it seats straight and doesn’t go in at an angle; you get one chance to screw it in so when it seats screw it down tightly grasping the lens barrel in your left hand NOT THE CAMERA BODY! Also, remember one thing: this is not an interchangeable device for your camera – once you have it on the lens you will never be taking it off, again! Now, rifle through the Pro Camera store’s junk bin for the appropriate sized lens cap and, VIOLA! You can now use any filter you want! I tend to use a Deep Yellow or Deep Red filter when shooting B&W. Another trick is to use a #6 Nuetral Density filter to “halve” your exposures when doing double exposures. You can even play around with Star Filters to give your night photography a really dreamy effect! I hope this was informative! Check out my blog: holgamodgod.blogspot.com… GRIZZ

  7. neal

    the images are truly beautiful. they are lke a breath of fresh air.
    i use a Holga and would be proud to hang with any of you.

  8. lumi

    Nice photos. They have in themselves to something

  9. eka

    that’s great!! I really like these photos.

  10. oky

    i like this photo… it’s amazing….

  11. Boost Inspiration

    Amazing photos.

  12. VBonnefond

    I really do love its rendering. Something special, a strange feeling either in b&w than in color with its strange saturation.
    Thanks for this article.

  13. lele

    I just found a bag of filters, and in the bunch i found a Tiffen 52mm 4 Point 1mm Star, do you think i could put this on my Holga some how, and would it really do anything?

  14. Abinash Mohanty

    wow! amazing piece of work :) quire inspiring…

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