Powerful B/W Photography by Cole Thompson

Cole Thompson is a terrific fine art photographer who works in black and white. As he grew up in an era of black and white media, it was natural for him to continue in this style. “For me color records the image, but black and white captures the feelings that lie beneath the surface,” he says. The expressiveness and subtleties of his pictures are incredible and indeed it’s hard to see how color can add anything to these images.

To see more of Cole’s photography, visit his website.

Cole Thompson Black & White

Harbinger No. 1

Cole Thompson Black & White

Zabrieski Point

Cole Thompson Black & White

Road to Nowhere

Cole Thompson Black & White

Monolith No. 27

Cole Thompson Black & White

Explosive Wave

Cole Thompson Black & White

Fountainhead No. 70

Cole Thompson Black & White

Monolith No. 15

Cole Thompson Black & White

Lone Man No. 37

Cole Thompson Black & White

Lone Man No. 20

Cole Thompson Black & White

Death Valley Dune

Cole Thompson Black & White

Lone Man No. 6

Cole Thompson Black & White

Harbinger No. 11

Cole Thompson Black & White

Railroad Tracks

Cole Thompson Black & White

Windmill in Moonlight

Cole Thompson Black & White

Chuzenji-ko

Cole Thompson Black & White

Dunes of Nude No. 43

Cole Thompson Black & White

Monolith No. 42

Cole Thompson Black & White

The Angel Gabriel




Leave a Reply

4 Comments on "Powerful B/W Photography by Cole Thompson"

avatar
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Jay Long
Guest

Powerful could be an understatement; truly awesome images. I’ve been struggling with “movement-in-foreground” issues, but “The Angel Gabriel” brings some insight to the dilemma. Great, inspirational material.

Daryll
Guest

Very unique photography! I agree with you black and white could take you deeper than your mind could ever wonder.

daryll
Guest

still reading at your blog post and can’t take my eyes off it!

Ron
Guest

Perhaps Cole was named after Cole Weston? Words can do no justice to these amazing shots, so I won’t try to go beyond SUPERB. B&W images do indeed evoke more feelings than their color cousins. (or is it because I started with large format B&W film and resisted going digital as long as I could?)

Back To Top