Spectacular Images of Horses by Tina Thuell

For award winning photographer Tina Thuell, a deep passion for photography started when she was a young girl. At the age of 9, she stumbled upon a film camera lying in the street in her neighborhood, after asking around she decided to keep it for herself. This is where it all began, not only her passion for photography, but the journey that she has lived out for many years. Her greatest inspiration is the horse which is what her photography is based around. Tina loves not only making a photograph, but sharing the stories behind an individual image. Photography has given her the opportunity to travel, experience the world, and live out her dream with horses.

If you would like to see more of Tina’s photography, check out her website and Facebook.

Wild Horses in Iceland mutually groom each other.

Wild Horses in Iceland mutually groom each other.

Wild mustangs rescued from BLM holding  pens, once again  roam free at the Wild Horse Sanctuary,  'Return to Freedom'  in Lompoc, California.

Wild mustangs rescued from BLM holding pens, once again roam free at the Wild Horse Sanctuary, ‘Return to Freedom’ in Lompoc, California.

Sermon on the Mount....Another spectacular Icelandic sky with a gorgeous herd of horses gathering on the mount.

Sermon on the Mount….Another spectacular Icelandic sky with a gorgeous herd of horses gathering on the mount.

A close knit family of rescued wild mustangs at Return to Freedom Sanctuary in California.

A close knit family of rescued wild mustangs at Return to Freedom Sanctuary in California.

They moved as if they were of one mind and one body. Iceland 2012

They moved as if they were of one mind and one body. Iceland 2012

Trekking across the River Hop in Iceland. Riders and extra horses make the crossing at a gallop. Trekkers will ride hard all day switching out horses up to 4 or 5 times a day so that horses stay fresh and eveyone gets a break.

Trekking across the River Hop in Iceland. Riders and extra horses make the crossing at a gallop. Trekkers will ride hard all day switching out horses up to 4 or 5 times a day so that horses stay fresh and eveyone gets a break.

Hjorsei Island off the Northern coast of Iceland is home to the last true wild herd.

Hjorsei Island off the Northern coast of Iceland is home to the last true wild herd.

Crashing through the River Hop (pronounced Hope) near Blondous in Iceland.  The  Icelandic horses  are Known for their stamina and during a day of trekking, they  can run for many hours with the help of short breaks in between.  As well, the Icelandic breed are                 great swimmers as it has been a part of their  life in Iceland for centuries.

Crashing through the River Hop (pronounced Hope) near Blondous in Iceland. The Icelandic horses are Known for their stamina and during a day of trekking, they can run for many hours with the help of short breaks in between. As well, the Icelandic breed are great swimmers as it has been a part of their life in Iceland for centuries.

A foal runs close to his mother during some play time in the open fields near Condom, France.

A foal runs close to his mother during some play time in the open fields near Condom, France.

A beautiful Spanish PRE Stallion, Mid Pyrenees, Southern France

A beautiful Spanish PRE Stallion, Mid Pyrenees, Southern France.

Stunning Cremello Lusitano Stallion, Southern France

Stunning Cremello Lusitano Stallion, Southern France.

A beautiful Spanish PRE Stallion, Mid Pyrenees, Southern France

A beautiful Spanish PRE Stallion, Mid Pyrenees, Southern France.

A band of young Lusitanos mares race in unison against the last of the evening light, southern France

A band of young Lusitanos mares race in unison against the last of the evening light, southern France.

Up Close and Personal. The exquisite face of the beautiful Pre Andulsian Stallion at Epona de la Terquedad, France

Up Close and Personal. The exquisite face of the beautiful Pre Andulsian Stallion at Epona de la Terquedad, France.

Wild Horses from The Great Divide Basin in Wyoming, battle for dominance. The strong conversation lasted just 15 seconds and was followed by total calm.

Wild Horses from The Great Divide Basin in Wyoming, battle for dominance. The strong conversation lasted just 15 seconds and was followed by total calm.

This stallion was a joy to watch as he put on a grand show for us when turned loose. Southern France

This stallion was a joy to watch as he put on a grand show for us when turned loose. Southern France

There was a gentleness in this Lusitano stallion that was remarkable to experience. Here you can see it in his eyes!

There was a gentleness in this Lusitano stallion that was remarkable to experience. Here you can see it in his eyes!

The Merens Horse is a rare french breed that has run semi wild high in the Pyraneese Mountains for centuries. This horse is known for its' hardiness and sure footedness while roaming the steep mountain cliffs.

The Merens Horse is a rare french breed that has run semi wild high in the Pyraneese Mountains for centuries. This horse is known for its’ hardiness and sure footedness while roaming the steep mountain cliffs.

A family band of wild Mustangs shares a brief,  calm moment at the water hole in The Great Divide Basin in Wyoming.

A family band of wild Mustangs shares a brief, calm moment at the water hole in The Great Divide Basin in Wyoming.

Beautiful Wild and Free on Hjorseii Island off of the Northern Coast of Iceland.

Beautiful Wild and Free on Hjorseii Island off of the Northern Coast of Iceland.

Icelands last wild herd lives off the Northern Coast on an Island called Hjorseii. Accessible only by boat, these wild horses swim between the Island and main land in search of food and are also known to eat seaweed. A strong, smart and gentle breed; the Icelandic Horses are treasured by their country and people.

Icelands last wild herd lives off the Northern Coast on an Island called Hjorseii. Accessible only by boat, these wild horses swim between the Island and main land in search of food and are also known to eat seaweed. A strong, smart and gentle breed; the Icelandic Horses are treasured by their country and people.

Horses living in the wild form strong bonds with each other. It is deeply moving, an honor to witness, and a joy to photograph.

Horses living in the wild form strong bonds with each other. It is deeply moving, an honor to witness, and a joy to photograph.

The wild horses of Iceland show us what ' Family' looks like.

The wild horses of Iceland show us what ‘Family’ looks like.

Take a gorgeous icelandic Stallion and turn him loose in a filed of wild Lupine and a stunning evening light and you have pure magic!

Take a gorgeous Icelandic Stallion and turn him loose in a filed of wild Lupine and a stunning evening light and you have pure magic!

With the Mountains as a backdrop, this beautiful Icelandic had a great time running through a field of wild flowers. His curious nature is so evident on his face.

With the mountains as a backdrop, this beautiful Icelandic had a great time running through a field of wild flowers. His curious nature is so evident on his face.

Horses galloping across the River Hop, Iceland.

Horses galloping across the River Hop, Iceland.

The family bond is a beautiful sight to see as this stallion connects with one of his mares while she is nursing.

The family bond is a beautiful sight to see as this stallion connects with one of his mares while she is nursing.

Icelandic horses come in every single colour except, spotted Appaloosa.

Icelandic horses come in every single colour except, spotted Appaloosa.

A young foal rests peacefully in the warmth of the tall summer grass. Iceland

A young foal rests peacefully in the warmth of the tall summer grass. Iceland

This mare keeps a close and watchful eye on her young foal while he rests in the tall summer grass. Iceland

This mare keeps a close and watchful eye on her young foal while he rests in the tall summer grass. Iceland

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